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Antibacterial activity of C10 and C12 fatty acids and their sucrose esters towards Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens

Abstract number: P1167

Skrivanova E., Marounek M., Prazakova S.

Antibacterial activity of C10 and C12 fatty acids and their sucrose esters against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Clostridium perfringens CNCTC 5459 was evaluated. In our previous experiments, C2–C18 free fatty acids were tested for their antibacterial activity against a number of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The most effective ones (C10 for E. coli and C12 for C. perfringens) were chosen to compare their effect with the corresponding sucrose monoesters.

Methods: Susceptibility of E. coli and C. perfringens to fatty acids and their sucrose esters was evaluated using the plating method. Bacterial cultures were incubated in glucose medium containing C10 or C12 free fatty acids or their sucrose esters (0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 5 mg/ml). After the incubation, samples were serially diluted and inoculated on agar plates (MacConkey or Wilkins-Chalgren). After the incubation, typical colonies were counted and means and SD of CFU/ml were calculated. Differences between treated samples and non-treated control were evaluated using the t-test.

Results: Incubation of E. coli with C10 fatty acid and its ester led to a significant decrease in numbers of viable bacterial cells from 9.76 to 7.91–5.13 log10 CFU/ml. Sucrose ester of C10 showed stronger antibacterial properties than the free form of acid. Incubation of E. coli with free C10 fatty acid at the concetration of 5 mg/ml led to the reduction of bacterial cells from 9.76 to 6.84 log10 CFU/ml, whereas the same concentration of the corresponding ester reduced bacterial cells from 9.76 to 5.13 log10 CFU/ml. Gram positive C. perfringens was more sensitive to both forms of C12 fatty acid. Incubation of sucrose ester of lauric acid led to the reduction of viable cells bellow the detection limit (2 log10 CFU/ml), free acid showed the same effect at the concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/ml.

Conclusion: Both C10 and C12 fatty acids and their sucrose esters were shown to be potent antimicrobial agents against E. coli and C. perfringens. As expected, Gram positive C. perfringens was more sensitive. Sucrose esters of fatty acids were shown to be more potent antimicrobials than free acids.

Supported by project MZe 0002701404.

Session Details

Date: 07/05/2011
Time: 00:00-00:00
Session name: Abstracts of 21st ECCMID / 27th ICC
Subject:
Location: Milan, Italy, 7 - 10 May 2011
Presentation type:
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